MAUSGS_SEC_6_DL

New Paper: Modeling Daily Stream Temperature

Our paper, “A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags” was just published today in the journal PeerJ. We developed a statistical model of daily stream temperature for a watershed in Western Massachusetts, USA. We outline the major challenges of statistical stream modeling and show how our model…

dplyr is great…but

I have been loving Hadley Wickham’s new dplyr package for R. It creates a relatively small number of verbs to quickly and easily manipulate data. It is generally as fast as data.table but unless you’re already very familiar with data.table the syntax is much easier. There are a number of great introductions and tutorials, which…

Paper Summary: Natural Disturbance and Logging Effects on Salamanders

Paper Summary: Hocking, D.J., K.J. Babbitt, and M. Yamasaki. 2013. Comparison of Silvicultural and Natural Disturbance Effects on Terrestrial Salamanders in Northern Hardwood Forests. Biological Conservation 167:194-202. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.08.006 Unfortunately, this paper is behind a paywall. Please email me if you would like a copy for educational purposes. We were interested in how red-backed salamanders…

In Praise of Exploratory Statistics

In Praise of Exploratory Statistics If you haven’t seen it, you should definitely check out the latest post by Brian McGill at Dynamic Ecology. It’s a great post on the use of exporatory statistics. While it may be impossible to get an NSF grant with an analysis framed in terms of exploratory statistics, reviewers should…

No Statistical Panacea, Hierarchical or Otherwise

Everyone in academia knows how painful the peer-review publication process can be. It’s a lot like Democracy, in that it’s the worst system ever invented, except for all the others. The peer-review process does a fair job at promoting good science overall, but it’s far from perfect. Sure anyone can point out a hundred flaws…