dplyr is great…but

I have been loving Hadley Wickham’s new dplyr package for R. It creates a relatively small number of verbs to quickly and easily manipulate data. It is generally as fast as data.table but unless you’re already very familiar with data.table the syntax is much easier. There are a number of great introductions and tutorials, which…

Paper Summary: Natural Disturbance and Logging Effects on Salamanders

Paper Summary: Hocking, D.J., K.J. Babbitt, and M. Yamasaki. 2013. Comparison of Silvicultural and Natural Disturbance Effects on Terrestrial Salamanders in Northern Hardwood Forests. Biological Conservation 167:194-202. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.08.006 Unfortunately, this paper is behind a paywall. Please email me if you would like a copy for educational purposes. We were interested in how red-backed salamanders…

In Praise of Exploratory Statistics

In Praise of Exploratory Statistics If you haven’t seen it, you should definitely check out the latest post by Brian McGill at Dynamic Ecology. It’s a great post on the use of exporatory statistics. While it may be impossible to get an NSF grant with an analysis framed in terms of exploratory statistics, reviewers should…

Conference Presentations

I recently gave a talk at the Ecological Society of America (ESA) annual meeting in Portland, OR and a poster presentation at the World Congress of Herpetology meeting in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Both presentations were comparing generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) and generalized estimating equations (GEE) for analyzing repeated count data. I advocate for using…

R script to calculate QIC for Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) Model Selection

[UPDATE: IMPROVED CODE AND EXTENSIONS ARE NOW AVAILABLE ON https://github.com/djhocking/qicpack INCLUDING AS AN R PACKAGE] Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) can be used to analyze longitudinal count data; that is, repeated counts taken from the same subject or site. This is often referred to as repeated measures data, but longitudinal data often has more repeated observations.…